The Countries of Origin for Popular Beers

The history of beer in Malaysia takes us back to 1968, where Guinness and Malayan Breweries merged to become Guinness Anchor Berhad. In 1970, Carlsberg started their brewery in Kuala Lumpur. Since then, many local breweries have sprouted in the country, leading to a wide variety of beers available for locals to enjoy. Of course, these brands originated elsewhere, so let’s take a look at where our favourite pints came from.


 

1)  Carlsberg – Denmark

Carlsberg’s roots are planted firmly in Denmark, where the brand was founded in 1847. J.C. Jacobsen created the brand, and named after his son – Carl. Brewing was in their blood, Jacobsen’s father was one until he passed away, leaving his son to take over the task. He wasn’t content with merely brewing though, and sought to improve the quality of beer.

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2) Guinness – Ireland

Arthur Guinness is a memorable name, as it’s evoked annually in celebration of the man who created this most famous stout. Quite amazing for a man who started brewing ales in 1759. This is an Irish brand with humble beginnings in Dublin, to be precise. Also, Guinness is brewed in 50 countries today.

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3) Tiger – Singapore

Tiger is Singapore’s pride, as the first local brewed beer. It all started in 1932, and today it’s brewed in 11 countries and enjoyed in over 75 countries all over the world. Brewing is meticulous, taking over 500 hours and using the finest ingredients from Australia and Europe.

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4) Budweiser – United States of America 

Budweiser is as American as it gets, hailing from St. Louis, Missouri. German native Adolphus Busch created Budweiser following a move to Missouri, and a career at a local brewery. He was quite innovative, even going as far as to pasteurize beer. The heat of St. Louis also inspired a different beer, and Budweiser’s crisp taste is a result of this.

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5) Heineken – Netherlands

Netherlands is the birthplace of Heineken, and their story began in 1864. It’s not just any beer of course. Besides being instantly recognizable as a supporting “character” in many films and TV shows, Heineken is also the number one brewer in Europe. Though its original brewery in Amsterdam is now closed, it can be viewed as part of the Heineken Museum experience.

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6) Corona Extra – Mexico

This is known as a pale lager, and it comes from Mexico. It is quite a familiar brand, and is one of the top-selling beers worldwide as well.  It was introduced in 1925, and today is even used to sponsor sporting events, adding to its presence on a global scale. A common sight on beaches and in the hands of anyone looking for some downtime, this beer is the quintessential companion for anyone seeking respite.

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7) Hoegaarden – Belgium

The name Hoegaarden actually refers to a place in Belgium, where this brewery originated. Hoegaarden’s story began in 1445. Today, they have several different types of beer, including Rosee and Citron, to add to their already impressive roster. It is a beer with a sweet and sour taste, and a slight bitterness.

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8) Asahi – Japan

We’re really going around the world here for our beers, and this time it’s to gorgeous Tokyo. They started off as the Osaka Beer Company, founded in 1899. Fun fact, “Asahi” means rising sun, and is meant to symbolize national pride, since Japan is known as “The Land of the Rising Sun”.

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9) Kilkenny – Ireland

This beer is a cream ale, which hails from the city of Kilkenny itself – in Ireland. Though not much is stated on its origins, it is said that it dates back to the 14th century. Nowadays, it’s brewed elsewhere in Dublin and seems to be quite popular in Australia and New Zealand. It’s also a favourite among Canadians, particularly after Canadian celebrities were seen drinking the beverage.

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10) Paulaner – Germany

Paulaner Brewery’s origins take us to Munich, Germany, circa 1634. In those days, friars in a monastery brewed the beer. Today, Paulaner exports beer to more than 70 countries, but still operates in a very traditional way, keeping Munich’s traditions alive. In fact, Paulaner beer is very recognizable as it’s one of the beers featured in Germany’s Oktoberfest.

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